About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CNNW 36
CSPAN 7
CNN 6
MSNBCW 6
CSPAN2 4
FBC 3
MSNBC 3
KCSM (PBS) 2
WHUT (Howard University Television) 2
KNTV (NBC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
KRON (MyNetworkTV) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 103
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 108 (some duplicates have been removed)
an israeli soldier, palestinian militant and dozens of civilians. egypt's foreign minister announced this in cairo alongside secretary of state, hillary clinton. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, binyamin netanyahu, confirmed the deal saying that he had agreed to give the cease-fire a chance after speaking with president obama. secretary of state, hillary clinton said the united states and egypt will work together in working toward long-term peace in the middle east. listen. >> the united states welcomes the agreement today if a cease-fire in gaza, and now a broader calm returns. >> the truce is hours after a bomb tore through a bus near israel's defense ministry in tel aviv. the explosion injured two dozen people, hamas leaders praised the attack but did not take responsibility. in gaza, israel struck more than 100 targets including hamas government buildings. officials in the palestinian territory set to strike and killed to dozen including to children. we have coverage from jonathan hunt at the united nations but, first, we go to david lee miller on the ground in southern
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
, president obama, has called and talked to the president of egypt, morsi, three times now in the last 24 hours. really trying to put a u.s. stamp, footprint, if you will, on the negotiations. how much leverage does the u.s. have in actually making sure that the cease-fire is something that's going to hold? >> well the u.s. doesn't have much leverage over hamas because the u.s. doesn't deal with hamas. the u.s. government, previous governments, regards hamas as a terrorist organization. when secretary of state hillary clinton visits here in jerusalem later, then goes to ramallah to meet with mahmoud abbas tomorrow and then goes to cairo she's not going to meet with anyone from hamas. the u.s. does have leverage on egypt, given the economic and military assistance the u.s. provides to egypt and given the dire economic straits that the egyptians are in right now. so the u.s. has leverage on the egyptians and obviously the u.s. has very good relations with israel. so the u.s. is a key player in all of this. but as far as leverage on hamas, u.s. leverage is limited. >> secretary of state hill
headquarters. >> it's a move threatening to plunge egypt into the kind of turmoil not seen since the fall of former egyptian leader mubarek. protestors saying morsi has declared himself the new faro and they are calling for a change in egypt's ruling regime. steve hair again is live from kie rope. >> the number of protestors building once again behind me. the number of several,000. we have seen squirm michiganis through out t-- skirmishes toda. it has been a cat and mouse game through out the day with police charging and retreating to come back a short time later. they are using large concrete blocks to build walls and protecting government buildings as well. two things to keep an eye on. they say they will not go back to work until the president repeals his decree a decree that puts him beyond the reach of the court so it could shut down prosecutions across the country. the egyptian stock market plunged 10 percent today. such a dramatic plunge has not been seen since mubarek was over thrown one year ago. >> thank you very much for that live report from cairo. >> it has been nearly two ye
. all of this is happening and secretary of state clinton has gone to egypt and the west bank helped broker a cease-fire deal. joining us now is michael oren who is is really ambassador to the united states it's great to have you with us today. >> good to be with you too, jenna. jenna: what information you have about the bombing? >> we don't know who is responsible yet, but we do know that hamas is celebrating. giving out candy to children, you can go on youtube and see that hamas supporters saying that they want more israeli body bags. it is about genocidal groups in gaza trying to kill the maximum number of israelis, while we are trying to defend ourselves and reduce the palestinian civilian casualties to the greatest extent that we can. the terrorists are digging in behind us million population. jenna: how has the cease fire talks been going? >> they have not been going well. they are discussing a long-term arrangement to put in a mechanism that prevent hamas from shooting at our population and paralyzing half the country. also stopping iran from smuggling long-range missiles into
on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking on fighters that are smuggling weapons in, and they see israel as an illegal occupying force for more than 40 years. they see this as an unjust, as a lopsided conflict, and they want president morsi to do something about it. at the same time mr. morsi has made it clear that he doesn't want to disrupt his alliances with was
.s. relationship with egypt. but, first, the former c.i.a. director, general petraeus, today, testified on the deadly attack in benghazi, libya, that killed four americans, including our ambassador. the hearings happened hype closed doors so we do not have recordings of the general's testimony. according to the republican congressman peter king of new york he said from the beginning he believed benghazi was a terrorist attack. the c.i.a.'s talking points also called it terrorism. congressman king added, someone or some group, then, removed the terror reference but it is not clear who did that. >> the original talking points...there were indications finally at the end indications of extremists although there was cheerly evidence to the c.i.a. that it was clear there were pirates involved. susan rice said a spontaneous protest over an anti-islam video sparked the attack but democratic lawmakers say that can be explained. >> what is very clear is that ambassador rice used the talking points the intelligence committee had all signed off on. >>trace: they added that the c.i.a. approved the t
troops are poised at the border, ready to move at gaza. negotiations speer headed by egypt are ongoing, and tonight the united nations secretary-general ban ki-moon arrived in cairo, just hours after egypt's intelligence chief gave an israeli delegation a letter from hamas outlining its conditions for a cease-fire. so far on the israeli side, officials say throw people have died. 68 have been wounded as the result of rocket fire from gaza and in gaza, officials say 104 people have been killed. 860 have been wounded since the conflict began. as for fire power, israel says militants in gaza have fired nearly 1,000 rockets at israel. 570 of them have actually struck israel. another 307 have been intercepted by israel's so-called iron dome defense system. meanwhile, israel carried out 80 strikes today. it has now targeted 1,300 sites in gaza since it began its bombing campaign last wednesday. ben wedeman is in gaza city tonight. ben, how are civilians dealing with this conflict? some of those numbers we hear, 870 people injured are frightening. >> yeah, they're not dealing very well with i
will watch over the next few days. one more thing. it is important to remember egypt is the largest country in the region by population. it clearly has sway over the stability of the region. we have seen that recently in the conflict between hamas or the minutes and the israelis. is it your sense that things are teetering? the whole region seems to teeter with it. >>reporter: when you have such a large crowd in a square with tear gas and rocks being thrown it can be sparked off, bad things can happen, when a few people are killed. it can lead to worst things happening. the other side has shown some real restraint. we saw consolation of a protest movement by the muslim brotherhood today. if you get both sizes demonstrating, that is a recipe for disaster, the other side has held back. >>shepard: so far, steve. thank you very much. >> the important thing here is, remember, it is presidential morsi who helped bring together this truce teen the israelis and hamas and the palestinians. if there are problems with morsi or situations change in egypt and theon is destagized that is as serious as any
in the past two days. three died yesterday from rocket fire. egypt dispatched its prime minister to gaza to show support for the palestinian people and hamas today. he met with hamas's prime minister about the casualties on the ground. he visited a hospital, showed emotion over the death of a 1-year-old boy. he also read a verse from the koran and later egypt's president mohammed morsi gave a fiery speech in support of the palestinian people on state tv. listen. >> we support the people of gaza. what hurts them, hurts us. >> hate and violence between the israelis and palestinians was sparked by this. israel's assassination of hamas's military chief on wednesday. an assassination that israel called necessary because of increased rocket attacks from gaza into israel the last several weeks. our senior international correspondent ben wiederman has been covering the middle east. you've been covering it for decades now. when you see israel moving hundreds of troops to the border of israel and gaza and saying it's going to call up 16,000 more reservists, what does that sound like they're prepar
that egypt is fast becoming an islamic state. >> hosni mubarak never divided the egyptian people. now, there is president morsi, and we do not know if he is the president of egypt or the president of the muslim brotherhood. >> islamists who dominate the assembly have already answered that question -- the body signed off on all 234 articles of the constitution, which is based upon the principles of sharia or islamic law. the constitution maintains sharia as the main source of legislation. it also gives women no guarantee of equal rights, since the rights must conform with sharia. religious leaders will also be able to directly influence egyptian legislation in the future. secular and christian representatives boycotted the vote. they had already withdrawn from the assembly weeks ago. in a television interview, morsi again tried to appease the opposition forces. he said the sweeping forces to granted himself last week will only remain until a constitution goes into effect, but that is not enough for his opponents who have vowed to keep on protesting. >> those protests have been growing
invasion as a very credible threat and that is done a lot to get the united states and egypt involved in the negotiations. the media work continues. the israelis have dropped leaflets over the gaza strip saying they are coming and prepared to invade and telling people to move to certain areas. at the same time hamaz is sending out text messages to israeli cell phones, specifically to the ones they think are linked to the army saying we will make gaza your graveyard. the tea leaves will finally be able to be read whenever hour for the cease-fire comes or we either have one or very shortly there after that ground offensive could start back to you. jenna: leland thank you so much. we'll talk a little bit about trouble we had at the u.s. embassy in tel-aviv today where a israeli man wielding a knife and an action attacked a security guard. they say the guard fired into the air and was only slightly injured. the suspect is now in custody. there are reports he had some mental health problems. police say political motives are not suspected at this time. jon: as we told you at the top of the
this aggression. egypt. egypt, the revolution, will not spare any effort to stop this aggression. and achieve a sustainable truce. >> meanwhile in washington, we're joined by two guests, the award winning palestinian journalist mohammed omer, and we want to teach you for being with us, back again, thank you so much. tell us what is happening on the ground in gaza right now. >> you are welcome. let me start with -- i'm in the southern part of the gaza strip s just launched two missiles, killing one person and a person has just arrived to the hospital. he was 24 years old. that brings the number of air strikes last three days to 502. this resulted in the killing of a 23 -- killing of 23 people, most of whom more civilians. we need to talk about the humanitarian situation in the gaza strip. this is a situation targeting a population of civilians, israel is shooting in a fishbowl. there is no shelter and nowhere to run for the general population. because that is living in a very dire situation. the u.n. has decided to shut all of these schools tomorrow as well as the ministry of education, higher
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
: in the middle of all of this, it's a very unstable and frankly, unpredictable egypt. and it could be the key. >> yeah. egypt is absolutely a key player in this. right now it's new muslim brotherhood president, morsi, appears to be playing both sides. he has reportedly quietly given the green light to his intelligence services to put pressure on hamas to scale back on those rocket attacks, while publicly he is sending his prime minister to the gaza strip tomorrow in what will clearly be a show of solidarity with the palestinians. now, the egyptian calculation may be that by having their prime minister there, they will cause a pause in the fighting because israel will be reluctant to carry on with the air strikes and launch any kind of ground invasion while such a high ranking egyptian politician is there. that might, of course, help the palestinians. on the other hand, any pause in the fighting also gives a little more time for diplomacy to start work. but watching what egypt's leaders say and do in the next few days is going to be key in what happens next in this very tense situation. shep.
the 35-day deadline passes. and congress gets back to work this morning. plus a power grab in egypt. mohamed morsi under fire for granting himself extraordinary powers. will that affect cease-fire talks between israel and hamas? they're happening in egypt today. >> and $59 billion! retail records broken as americans crowded stores for some competitive shopping over the weekend. and now cyber monday is here. will shoppers be in even more of a spending mood? >> you want to talk about money? a new powerball jackpot. a new record in the cash payout. it's unreal. >> a packed two hours ahead for you this morning. new jersey congressman bill pascrell will be joining us, grover norquist, jamie rubin, dr. hanan ashrawi, will be our guest, peter billingsley from a christmas story, and grinle college hoops star jack taylor. remember him? big game he had the other day. and the one and only tony bennett, monday, november 26th. welcome, everybody, "starting point" this morning. is that a hint of compromise in the air on capitol hill? 35 days left till we reach the fiscal cliff. and a couple of ke
're in "the situation room." >>> tensions heading toward a tipping point in egypt where thousands of mourners today marched through cairo's tahrir square for the funeral of a man killed in protest against the president. mohamed morsi is accused of a massive power grab, slashing the authority of judges, barring courts from overturning his rulings. the secretary of state hillary clinton today told her egyptian counterpart that the united states does not want to see power concentrated in one set of hands. even as president morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has blasted his actions. let's go live to cnn's reza sayah in cairo watching what's going on. lots of people in tahrir square. we have live pictures of that as well. i understand that morsi actually met today with some of these top judges? >> reporter: he did, wolf. a lot of people eager to see how president morsi responds to this political crisis if he would back down under mounting pressure, if he'd make some concessions. it seems forn now the answer is no. many viewed one of his decrees as essentially disabling the judici
in the middle east. riots breaking out in egypt after president morsi effectively declares himself a dictator. welcome to "america live", everyone. hope you had a nice thanksgiving. now back to the news. i'm megyn kelly. that press briefing, the very first before after the thanksgiving holidays. there is a lot to talk about. the middle east will be a hot topic. this is what it looked like over in cairo over the weekend while you were with your family probably not paying too much attention to the news. but, boy, things are unfolding there in a major way with thousands of angry demonstrators calling president morsi, the new pharaoh and raising questions about our relationship with what was once a critical ally in the region. steve harrigan streaming live from cairo where we've been watching the crowds get bigger and bigger in tahrir square. steve? >> reporter: megyn, it looks like president morsi is trying to give the appearance trying to find a way out of the situation, some sort of compromise from the firestorm he set off four days ago with a order basically says any decrease he issues are po
gay people straight. she'll join me next. >>> plus, as egypt's president comes under fire, president morsi speaks out about president obama. speaking live with someone that just interviewed morsi, don't miss this. shopping for medicare coverage? don't wait. open enrollment ends december 7th. now's the time to take action. call unitedhealthcare today. >>> now to egypt. several new developments today. first off, dmon straights prompted the u.s. to shut down the embassy there. the embassy was not under fire but clashes between protesters and riot police clogged streets around the complex. this chaos is going on for days as demonstrators threatened the new islamic president morsi with a second revolution. >>> and then there's this. lawmakers dominated by islamists are now rushing to draft a new constitution. this move is seen by some of morsi's critics as an effort by the muslim brotherhood to hijack the constitution. and amid all of this, president morsi is on the cover of "time" magazine. "time" calls him the most important man in the middle east and boasts an exclusive interview credi
's targeting 100 sites across gaza. i know, youf heard this all before. this time it's different. because egypt is not happy with with israel. it's already reached out to president obama and told him, we must put an end to this aggression. sarah seidner is in the region and has the latest for us this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning, carol. yes, the number of those who have been killed during this escalation, fighting between gaza and israels had now risen. three people in israel inside an apartment building killed from a rocket attack sent from gaza, from hamas, the government here. we're now learning that 15 people have been killed here in total today, here in gaza, including nine militants, several children and a pregnant woman. what's happening now is off and on, we are hearing air strikes. again and again across the city, across gaza city and along the gaza strip. we know that there have been more than 196 rockets now that have entered into israel from gaza. we were there this morning when we saw ourselves 15 rockets coming in. some of those rockets being knocked down by th
. and if the diplomats, i know that ban ki-moon, the u.s. secretary general is on his way to egypt and israel. he's trying to get something going. i know representatives from all these other countries that have relations with hamas like e kwijipt and qatar and turkey, they're trying to get something going. there's intense efforts behind the scenes. i don't know if they're going to result in anything. i was asked yesterday what i thought the chances of a serious-fire were. i thought yesterday about 50/50. i haven't been able to talk with anybody in a position of authority here in israel. i've been here in the southern part along the border not far from the -- from gaza. but it doesn't look very promising. let's see if the diplomats can get something going. you point out that the feelings on both sides seem to be intensifying in a bad way. and i think that's right. >> senator john mccain came out and said, you know, we should send bill clinton in. he should be the mediator in this latest conflict. would israel or gaza welcome bill clinton? >> reporter: i've been saying that, actually, myself. i wro
of egypt, turkey and qatar, all met, all have varying degrees of influence over hamas, they are trying to broker some type of sees fire. egyptian president said when the meeting was over, they took a break, quoting him, some in of a cease-fire but nothing concrete. it looks like there's a possibility, still, a long way to go. >> harris: very interesting about egypt we'll be talking later inside the fox report about their role in this. the muslim brotherhood has aligned itself with the palestinians in this conflict. let's talk about what might make a sees fire a reality? >> reporter: as -- a cease-fire a reality? >> reporter: there could be a ground incursion"z. currents wht israel wants to make a cease-fire reality is for hamas to stop the rocket attacks that are being launched from gaza. rocket attack fast that hamas is responsible for as well as militant groups. hamas says they want israel to stop so-called targeted assassinations. both groups come to the take with something they want. how much of it is reality they are going to achieve a temporary cease-fire? very uncertain. a few d
florida, tallahassee, florida, at 11:00, whoever that is. that would be me. >>shepard: thank yous. egypt right now is fractured in a big way. the people there, the president, the courts, all fighting for power and no one knows who will come out on top. we will have a like update from cairo. a new study shows most of the pork we eat is contaminated with dangerous bacteria. it is a really danger according to the health experts. people really love snapshot from progressive, but don't just listen to me. listen to these happy progressive customers. i plugged in snapshot, and 30 days later, i was saving big on car insurance. with snapshot, i knew what i could save before i switched to progressive. the better i drive, the more i save. i wish our company had something this cool. you're not filming this, are you? aw! camera shy. snapshot from progressive. test-drive snapshot before you switch. visit progressive.com today. >>shepard: sometime a horrible mess in egypt, with tear gas and rubber bullets and protesters keeping their battle with police up as they continue to demonstrate against the new
republicans who break their pledges to voters. also tonight, demonstrations for a sixth straight day in egypt. the united nations on statehood for palestinians tomorrow and the president's spokesman says the white house is not concerned with ambassador rice misleading the public on benghazi. pillows a prize-winning journalist, a former pentagon official said among our guests. we begin tonight with that triple digit rally on wall street. the market interpreted positive statements on a potential deal on the fiscal cliff by house speaker and rebounded from what had been a 112-point slide after the morning's opening bell. the dow jones industrials reversed, as i said, on the speaker's positive remarks and finished the session up 107 points. s&p up 11, nasdaq gained 24. all ten s&p 500 sectors moved higher on the day. that is the first time it has happened since october 4th. retailers drove the consumer discretionary sector energy industrials lead in the wake, and the rally started just minutes before house speaker made it clear that republicans are willing to deal on revenue and ready to find a r
clinton heading into the region at this hour. she's going to be meting with leaders in israel, in egypt, in ramallah, that's going to start tomorrow. the israelis carrying out more than 80 air strikes overnight. 95 rockets back across the border. 38 palestinians killed in the last 24 hours. cnn has the conflict covered from all sides. christiane amanpour is live in jerusalem, arwa damon is on the ground in gaza city, richard plight again is in ashkelon in israel, jessica yellin is live in cambodia where secretary clinton has departed heading for the middle east. we begin with christiane. welcome. give us a sense of this new announcement from israel. how long do you think israel is waiting to silt on this halt before it would move forward with sending ground troops in? >> well, what was reported was that a senior government official in the loop close to the talks has confirmed to me this morning that after the latest intense round of conversations and meetings between prime minister netanyahu and his inner security cabinet, which went on into the early morning hours here jerusalem time,
defending their civilian population. the issue would be whether the, the arabs and president mursi in egypt can appoint some sort of horizon for the people of gaza that would allow them to kind of climb down, this is about humanitarian quarters. the people -- government and hamas government in gaza is feeling a little bit more emboldened because of these sort of these visits by these high level delegations from places like qatar and turkey and of course egypt. so, this is about pointing the queue to a future where there's a political process in place, and i think secretary clinton's going to be looking very hard at how do you talk about what happens after this? because the only way people are going to stop, again, if they can stop, there are a lot of people in gaza with rockets and there's going to have to be a real concerted effort to, you know, weed those out, but also to create a political horizon. >> ambassador stuart holliday joining us this morning. thank you, sir, appreciate your time. >> thank you very much. >> ahead on "starting point" this morning, it's considered a key indicator
in the relationship with egypt. this was a relationship that was not defined. they were worried about deterioration. this crisis enabled them to create a link where egypt now is part of a deal, one that is supposed to be an enforcer of a deal. stature hashis risen. host: have they had direct contact? guest: i am not aware of any because the president has avoided that. the israelis typically even in negotiations, day-to-day negotiations, the egyptians subcontractor these issues mostly to the intelligence services. hosni mubarak did that as well. it was not even a foreign ministry issued. i doubt there was any contact. if you look at what happened with hamas itself, when you look at the war itself, clearly, hamas paid a heavier price. israel's power is massive compared to hamas. hamas fired a lot of rocket, but if you look at the casualties, you have the five israelis dead and over 1000 injured total. what hamas wanted to call a balance of fear. civilians are terrified and they are sleeping in bunkers. israeli kids and families are also fearful. that did not translate obviously into an asset for them
, china, south africa and egypt. >> i want a program that is more or less a mix of here and abroad. i did not want to do two consecutive years in germany, and i'm afraid i will never come back to egypt. >> the university wants students to go home when they graduate and contribute to their country's development. this didn't come from johannesburg to study water and engineering. she will be spending her second semester in berlin. >> i am looking forward to it. hopefully i come back in october. that should be really cool. i look forward to meeting new people in berlin in making new friends. >> many universities in germany can only dream of universities like these. it is the only institution of its kind in the world. >> we are traditionally an internationally oriented university, so it is a logical step to export our vision of education abroad. i think it will hugely boost our international reputation and the perception of our university abroad. >> the student dormitory is next to the campus. tuition is 5000 euros a semester. >> i miss my family, my mom, my dad, my sisters. but it is somethin
territory. >> can you speak to egypt's role? there was word that egypt's prime minister -- egypt and israel have had this agreement and then in place for years. once mohammed morsi took over as the president, and he was for the muslim brotherhood, many started to question if you will honor that agreement. it is critical to peace in the middle east. your thoughts now that they are getting involved to some extent? >> first to welcome the peace agreement between israel and egypt is for the mutual interest. i think it is the bedrock of stability in this region. it is important that we really keep that in mind and any move on the egyptian side to try to help out in this situation would be looked upon favorably. but first and foremost responsibility for any government is its citizens. we cannot continue with a situation like that. hamas, in a sense, has turned from the whole region. they are really the enemies of peace and we should really try to work together to make sure that the military infrastructure is weekend to such a manner that we will be able to sit down with moderate palestinians in o
. the body writing egypt's new constitution has been voting on the final draft. >> the assembly is signing off on that document bit by bit. they voted controversially to keep islamic law as the main source of legislation. most of the political opposition is boycotting the assembly. the document aims to transfer more power to egypt's parliament. critics say it is being rammed through too hastily. critics have already gathered where the president is expected to make an announcement. british lawmakers are looking at new ways to regulate the press. the calls for tougher guidelines come after an enquiry's report on crimes committed by reporters as they sought out sensational news stories. >> the inquiry picked up its work after 10 reporters were arrested at rupert murdoch's "news of the world" newspaper. among the charges, bribing the police. the inquiry has found the violations span decades. >> as the inquiry findings were read, activists gathered to protest what they termed robert murdoch's media mafia. the report found that reporters had routinely -- routinely packed into phones of celebriti
. >> reporter: what we're seeing here in egypt is a straight on -- 0 show down between mohamed morsi the country's first democratically elected president and his opponent. morsi is showing no signs of backing down from the expanded new powers that he gave himself last week including immunity from the court. judges from these top courts have gone on strike. meanwhile egypt's supreme constitutional court said it will rule on sunday on whether or not to dissolve the assembly that drafted egypt's new constitution. that assembly is dominated by morsi's allies. they are rushing to finish a final draft. on tahrir square in central cairo some opponents are camped out and say they won't leave until he relinquishes his new powers. president morsi supporters are planning a demonstration there on saturday. that could spark violent clashes. holly williams, cbs news, cairo. >> today the united nations is expected to vote to recognize palestine as a sovereign state. the vote to give the palestinians a non-member observer status is opposed by the united states and israel. >> reporter: good morning. that vote wi
a lot right now, and that is egypt that's taking a very firm stance, calling this an israeli aggression. but one of the interesting things that tony blair, the former british prime minister said, he said of course, right now everybody is on the phone, everybody is trying to negotiate, everybody is trying to bring the violence to an end. but at this point in time it certainly looks very much as though things are escalating rather than deescalating and that is certainly the message that we are getting from the israeli defense forces. >> fred pleitgen, thank you very much indeed. >>> joining me is the israeli ambassador to the u.n. welcome to you, sir. >> thank you. good evening. >> this is a dangerous situation, isn't it. what is your reading of what is happening on the ground? we're hearing tonight of 2,000 troops being moved, israeli troops, maybe 30,000 others being brought up as well. what are you hearing and what is the plan? >> well, i won't get into military operations but it has to be very, very clear. israel and israel's government will do anything it takes to protect its citizen
, president mubarak, out of leadership in egypt, there was -- they were assisting in creating instability around our other ally israel, and that instability continues to grow. one of the things that was helpful from egypt while president mubarak was in charge, at least there was some effort to restrict the transfer of rockets into the gaza strip. so there were some tunnels that would be found, the tunnels had to be kept small so they were able to get smaller rockets into gaza. but now that there's a new regime, apparently the bigger rockets are getting in to gaza and they pose more and more of a threat as they continue to be fired into israel. the action is not only the fall of an ally, president mubarak, but the assistance in bringing to power in egypt the muslim brotherhood. they want to see israel gone and they would also not mind seing the united states gone. it's important when formulating foreign policy that the united states, particularly the obama administration, decide, are we going to be assisted with our own personal security issue here in the united states by the actions we ta
in the west bank the right now she is in cairo meeting with egypt's president. mor morrissey is trying to broker a and when it happens we'll bring it to you live. wolf, i just wanted to ask about this bus attack in tel aviv. how large of a shadow does it cast? >> it's a very big shadow, the first time in at least i'm guessing six years that tel aviv has seen a terrorist incident like this. not that far away from the real commercial hub of the city. regular bus and about 20 people were injured. apparently a terrorist threw a bomb or whatever on the bus and escaped. the israelis did arrest someone later, but it proved to be a false arrest and they let that person go. there is someone on the loose right now who committed this. there are various groups claiming responsibility, though authoritatively no one has yet claimed responsibility. hamas did claim the incident, celebrated it, but didn't claim responsibility for it. one terrorist group claimed responsibility, but it's unclear from analysts if that's just a group trying to claim credibility that they had no involvement in. whatever it
with us. who was the strongest player in that whole period? it was egypt. egypt was strong because egypt has peace with israel. the way to be strong is not by making war and unilateral declarations in the u.n. that have no meaning. the way to gain strength is to be a partner. >> is the cease-fire holding? >> cease-fire's holding so far. >> and you thank egypt's president mohamed morsi for that? >> he is so far now proving to be a constructive partner certainly as proven in this last operation. >> is he honoring the peace treaty with israel? >> i think there's peace between egypt and israel on a daily basis, yes. >> what about syria? what would you like to see the government of israel as far as syria is concerned? because it's intense what's going on right now. about 40,000 people have been killed over the past year and a half. >> it's horrible. it's a terrible tragedy. we, the people of israel, look at the people of syria with great respect, even awe standing up and risking and even giving their lives for freedom from the terrible bashar al assad regime. we want them to go. we've long wa
is testing is real. israel is testing egypt. there is more uncertainty about israel and the end of -- the relationship with iran. what is hezbollah doing now that they are involved in their own fights inside syria? the opportunity for turkey to play a role right now. it just is the normans. this is probably the least secure discussion there is. i am reminded of bob dylan's favorite song. i propose we adopted as the anthem. there must be some way out of here. let's aim of for some relief, and maybe a little less confusion. i would like to propose the following format for the beginning of the panel. then i want to open it up for a lot of questions on the floor. i would like to propose our panelists talked about the situation right now, especially in syria. but what if scenarios, and their recommendation and context and perspective on greater security in the region and what steps might be taken in syria in particular. the people we have on the panel today have their year on the ground. y are constituencies there ar people whose opinions are sought. i would like to introduce a membe
asking you about what's going on in egypt right now where muhammad morsi must feel pretty emboldened after playing such a crucial role in helping to broker a ceasefire between's reel and hamas. -- between israel and hamas. he is now sort of changing the law of the land, a power grab. how's this going to work out? is. >> well, i think he's revealed his true stripes. this is not democracy in action, this is a classic effort at one person, one vote, one time. he's, obviously, met resistance. let's hope it's successful. but i think it's just highly ironic that after dozens of commentators left and right in this country hailed muhammad morsi for his responsible conduct with respect to gaza and how he wasn't acting like an an extremist from the muslim brotherhood got what he, got what he needed from the ceasefire agreement and immediately began acting like an extremist from the muslim brotherhood. that should be what we focus on going forward. and for anybody who thinks the ceasefire in gaza is durable, all they had to do was read these headlines about what morsi did in egypt the day after
to get her confirmed potentially at as the next secretary of state. that's next. plus, egypt's president sparked enormous protests when he gave himself broad new powers. basically made himself a dictator. and in a matter of hours, he is set to address his people for the first time since. but will he back down or make things worse for his country and probably ours, too? it's all ahead for the journalists of fox news on this wednesday fox report. it's great to have you in. a cus. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. johan comes in a porcelain vessel, crafted with care by a talented blonde from sweden. ♪ smooth, rich, never bitter, gevalia. share "not even close." share "you owe me..." share "just right." the share everything plan. sharable data across 10 devices with unlimited talk and text. get a droid razr m by motorola for $49.99. i'm going to dream about that steak. i'm going to dream about that tiramisu. what a night, huh? but, um, can the test drive be over now? head back to the dealership? [ male announcer ] it's practically yours.
-moon who traveled to cairo today where those negotiations are taking place. is he going to meet with egypt's president mohammed morsi tomorrow. later this week he will travel to israel to meet with prime minister netanyahu and also to the west bank to meet the palestinian president mahmoud abbas. the trouble with these negotiations as so often in these cases is who stops firing first. in the word of u.s. officials that is clearly up to hamas to do. listen. >> we have been very clear that israel has a right of self-defense. we have been very clear that rockets continue to be fired and land on israel. we have been very clear that we are working to try to get this conflict deescalated. we have been very clear about our concern for civilians and innocence on both sides. >> important to note that while diplomacy has not yet succeeded, neither, shep, has it failed. shep? >> shepard: jonathan hunt at the united nations for us. well, it was a huge day on wall street. as stocks soared to the best trading session since the presidential election since nearly two weeks ago. if you have been afraid to
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 108 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)